HEARING AIDS

Hearing aids will not “cure” your hearing loss. They will, however, be immensely helpful for maintaining your current hearing health and for establishing stronger communication habits. We offer many different brands and styles of hearing aids, and we are confident that we can find the best fit for you.

We offer trial periods for you to use our hearing aids and to determine the best match for you.

TYPES OF HEARING AIDS


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Invisible-in-Canal (IIC) are smaller and often custom-made hearing aid devices that sit inside of your ear canal. These hearing aids are great for people who want a discrete device. Their smaller size means they have more limited power, so they are great for people with mild to moderate hearing loss.

Completely-in-Canal (CIC) hearing aids also sit inside the ear canal, but they are slightly larger than the invisible-in-canal version. These devices are custom designs and many models include buttons to control volume, memory settings, and other programming options.


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Completely-in-Canal (CIC) hearing aids also sit inside the ear canal, but they are slightly larger than the invisible-in-canal version. These devices are custom designs and many models include buttons to control volume, memory settings, and other programming options.


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In-the-Ear (ITE) hearing aids sit in your ear bowl. These slightly larger devices have larger batteries and power outputs, so they work well for people with moderate to severe hearing loss. ITE hearing aids sometimes include wireless connectivity, volume control wheels, directional microphones, and other tech.

Behind-the-Ear (BTE) hearing aids sit behind your ear and have a small, very thin tube that connects to a small earbud inside of your ear canal. This “open fitting” style allows for natural airflow to enter your ear, leading to what some call a more natural sound. This is a very popular style of hearing aid because it is comfortable and relatively discreet and serves a variety of hearing needs.


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Behind-the-Ear (BTE) hearing aids sit behind your ear and have a small, very thin tube that connects to a small earbud inside of your ear canal. This “open fitting” style allows for natural airflow to enter your ear, leading to what some call a more natural sound. This is a very popular style of hearing aid because it is comfortable and relatively discreet and serves a variety of hearing needs.


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Receiver in the ear (RITE) or receiver in the canal (RIC) is a style of hearing aid that is very similar to the BTE. The main difference is that the technology of RIC hearing aids is split into two parts of the device: the case behind the ear contains the hearing aid’s microphone and sound amplifier. The small bud that is inserted into your ear canal and that is connected to the outer case by a thin tube contains the hearing aid’s receiver. This separation is very important. With the microphone and receiver separated, RIC hearing aids have very little feedback and there are fewer problems with occlusion.

RECHARGEABLE HEARING AIDS

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Most manufacturers now offer rechargeable hearing aids so you don’t have to worry with batteries. The aids can be put in their charging station overnight and be ready for between 16 and 20 hours of use once fully charged. This not only frees you from the hassle of dealing with batteries, but will also save you a considerable amount of money over the life of your aids.

Our Test Drive Helps You Adjust to Your New Hearing Aid

When you work with Southeast Medical Hearing to find the perfect hearing aid device, you get professional care and guidance every step of the way. Southeast Medical Hearing offers a trial period for hearing aids because we know that the relationship you establish with your hearing aid device early on is very important. We want you to make sure the fit is comfortable and that you are comfortable handling your device: that you can insert and remove it, that you are comfortable replacing the battery, and that you are familiar with any technological supplements your particular device may offer.


It can sometimes take quite a while to adjust to new hearing aids. Remember that your hearing will change over time with your new hearing assistance—we hope that our trial period gives you the time and space to become familiar with your changing hearing capabilities. You will want to practice patience as you adjust to your new hearing aid! Your brain will be firing on all cylinders as it becomes (re)familiarized with sounds you may not have heard for some time. These sounds can include wind noise, the hum of machinery, and passing traffic. Adjusting to a more complex hearing environment can sometimes be overwhelming and a bit exhausting. The Southeast Medical Hearing team will be with you every step of the trial process as you familiarize yourself with the physical hearing aid device—and, more importantly, as you become emotionally comfortable addressing your long-term hearing needs.


Contact Us at Southeast Medical Hearing

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