HEARING AID TEST DRIVE

When it comes to hearing aids, there are a number of brands on the market that make great, technologically advanced devices. Each of these brands has its own unique way of processing sound signals and a wide range of technological capabilities. This is good news, because each person has a unique brain with unique hearing needs. However, all of the different choices can feel a bit overwhelming.

That’s why we offer The Hearing Aid Test Drive™. While data logging and in-office testing are both valid methods that help determine your hearing needs, the best way to know which hearing aid is right for you is to wear them in real life. Our goal is to match your needs to the hearing aid that will work best for you based on your brain, your lifestyle, and other factors unique to you. Here’s how it works – it’s simple:

  • Make an appointment for a FREE initial hearing exam
  • Take home a state of the art hearing aid today. We allow you to try many different types and price levels with no commitment or deposit required.
  • Take your time to evaluating which hearing aid suits you best.

This Hearing Aid Test Drive allows us to work with you to find the best solution for your hearing needs, whether that means purchasing a hearing aid or not. We know that your hearing needs are as unique as you are, and we look forward to working with you through this process.

Maintaining healthy hearing habits is essential to maintaining an overall healthy lifestyle. When we begin to lose our hearing, it can be very disorienting in more ways than one. Whether hearing loss is gradual or rapid, long-lasting or temporary, it profoundly affects your abilities to communicate in and remain connected to the world around you.


Causes of Hearing Loss


Hearing loss can be caused by medical conditions or family history, or result from environmental factors. This can include working in loud workplaces, such as those with heavy equipment, that use explosives, or where there are frequent sirens. We can also contribute to our own hearing loss when we do not take adequate protective measures. Some causes of short-term and long-term hearing loss include:

– Advancing in age

– Family medical history

– Using earbuds instead of over-ear headphones

– Exposure to loud noises such as gunfire, explosions, factory machinery, and even loud music at concerts and dance clubs

– Listening to music, television, or movies at a high volume for long periods of time

– Blockages such as a buildup of ear wax

– Changes in air pressure from flying or underwater activities

Speech Recognition and Challenges with Communication

Hearing loss can make it difficult to participate in a variety of communication scenarios. Hearing loss impacts your abilities to follow conversations when there is more than one person present. This is especially the case when conversations are taking place in public places where there may be multiple conversations happening, or where music or other ambient sounds make it difficult to parse out the conversation at hand. Hearing loss can impede your ability to feel competent at work. Your hearing loss may make it difficult to track conversation in meetings, or to answer the phone for fear of speaking too loudly or softly.

Signs you may have hearing loss can include:

– Ringing, clicking, whistling, or buzzing in your ears

– Difficulty following conversation with individuals and/or groups of people

– Frequently asking people to repeat themselves

– Turning your TV or headphones to a high volume

– Difficulty making out distinct words within a conversation

– Preferring to hear out of one ear over the other


Recognize the Signs of Hearing Loss



Recognize the Signs of Hearing Loss


Signs you may have hearing loss can include:

– Ringing, clicking, whistling, or buzzing in your ears

– Difficulty following conversation with individuals and/or groups of people

– Frequently asking people to repeat themselves

– Turning your TV or headphones to a high volume

– Difficulty making out distinct words within a conversation

– Preferring to hear out of one ear over the other

There are also links between untreated hearing loss and depression, anxiety, and even dementia.

People experiencing gradual hearing loss, in particular, may find themselves avoiding social situations because it is frustrating, sad, or disappointing to feel like they cannot participate fully in conversation. When in social situations, people with untreated hearing loss can feel especially tired, stressed out, frustrated, annoyed, or nervous and embarrassed, from communicating in ways that do not feel effective.

Protecting Your Hearing

While hearing loss cannot be cured, it is important to use all the available tools to maintain current hearing levels. There are several ways to combat hearing loss, including hearing aids. There are other, small scale ways to treat hearing loss as well, however. Some of them include:

– Wearing ear plugs when working in loud environments such as factories

– Covering your ears in the face of sudden and temporary noises, such as when vehicles such as fire trucks and police cars pass by with their sirens on

– Trading in your in-ear headphones to over-ear headphones, creating distance between the sounds you are hearing and your delicate ear drums

– Limiting all use of headphones. A good rule of thumb is 60/60: listening at 60% volume for a maximum of 60 minutes a day.

– Limiting exposure to venues that produce loud sounds, such as loud concerts or dancehalls. If possible, take breaks every hour to give your ears a rest, and always remember to bring ear plugs.

Get in touch with Southeast Medical Hearing Centers

Have questions? Reach out to us today.

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